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 Post subject: Does.." i "..ever sound like.. " e " ?
PostPosted: 2006 10 12, 06:11 

Joined: 2006 09 12, 07:52
Posts: 21
Location: United States
Are there any instances where.." i "..sounds like.." e " in Lithuanian? Like in the word: see

For example, the word: penki

Thank you.


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PostPosted: 2006 10 12, 13:52 
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No, not really. i is a short vowel like in fill, whereas y is a 'long i' like in feel. However some dialects or slangs tend to elongate the short i.


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PostPosted: 2006 10 13, 01:50 

Joined: 2006 09 12, 07:52
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Oh, ok..aš suprantu. Perhaps, it may also be due to the fact that English speakers (in America, anyway) tend to enunciate their words, moreso. So, I guess the ears need adapting/training to "those" types of sounds. I mean, in most cases, I can hear the.." i "..as in "pit". But, if the.." i "..is stressed in some words it sounds like an.." e ". Even if I should know better... :) Plus, what you mentioned about slang and dialects.


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PostPosted: 2007 02 11, 23:56 

Joined: 2007 02 10, 20:26
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Location: Ryga, centras (Riga, capital of Latvia)
Harmonize wrote:
... in most cases, I can hear the.." i "..as in "pit". But, if the.." i "..is stressed in some words it sounds like an.." e ". ...


The reason is that in Lithuanian "i" [i] has more frontness (classified as a "front" vowel), while in English it is [ɪ], only a "near-front" vowel. The English "e" [i:] has the same frontness value as the Lithuanian [i].


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PostPosted: 2007 02 14, 01:55 
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1draugas wrote:
The reason is that in Lithuanian "i" [i] has more frontness (classified as a "front" vowel), while in English it is [ɪ], only a "near-front" vowel. The English "e" [i:] has the same frontness value as the Lithuanian [i].
Lithuanian i is /ɪ/, even in word-final positions; y and į are /i/...

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PostPosted: 2007 02 27, 16:11 

Joined: 2007 02 26, 13:25
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Location: Dublin, Ireland
I can see that the vowel in penki is a "short" i sound. But what about the i in the girl's name (and placename) Nida (vocative case)? To me that definitely sounds like a different vowel, more "need-a" than "nidd-a".


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PostPosted: 2007 02 27, 16:29 
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It should be "nidd-a". And it is the same sound as in penki.


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PostPosted: 2007 09 09, 19:53 
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Well I tried to ear some LT speaking, and for me when the 'i' is the last word it is mute.

I also was surprised when chatting with a lithuanian, he was writting 'gal' and 'tur', I said "sry I don't understand", then later I understood that it was 'gali' and 'turi', but he wrote as he speaks and didn't put the i.

Can I consider that 'i' in last letter of the word is never pronounced ?

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PostPosted: 2007 09 09, 21:01 
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Joined: 2007 05 18, 17:00
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Location: Tauragė, Lithuania
No.

I think you already know, but just making sure...

gali tu? - can you?
gal tu? - maybe you?

gali - from the word galėti (to be able)
gal is an own word meaning maybe

turbūt - likely, probably
turi būti - has to be

I haven't heard anyone skipping the i's in these words, since it would change the meaning. But the infinitive of a verb ends with 'i' (if it's not a prefixless reflexive verb) you can skip it in talking Lithuanian, turėt(i). Here is some info.

http://www.debeselis.net/forum/viewtopic.php?t=455

So you never shorten the verbs in 3rd person, like turi, gali. Maybe he was just a sloppy writer. Or his 'i'-button was missing :lol:

/Thomas


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PostPosted: 2007 09 09, 23:17 
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ok, so I really understood nothing :lol:



/HS

I am unable to answer in the concerned topic so I say it here :
I only asked to be moderator because I saw a lot of new spams with the date of today, and thought the problem unsolved, so, excuse me. :(

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: 2007 09 12, 09:31 

Joined: 2007 02 20, 15:39
Posts: 88
toto1919 wrote:
No.

turbūt - likely, probably
turi būti - has to be

So you never shorten the verbs in 3rd person, like turi, gali. Maybe he was just a sloppy writer. Or his 'i'-button was missing :lol:



Actually in some dialects of Lithuanian, you can shorten the i. So tur būt will be short for turi būti. Other examples:

Ką daryt? - what to do?
Ar jis gali. Gal, gal, ne mažas gi. - Can he do this? Yes, of course, he is smart enough.

But this is a feature of spoken language, in written form it is not used very frequently.


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PostPosted: 2007 09 12, 10:42 
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Interesting... Thanks for the info.

This is the way it goes when a Swede tries to give some hints regarding the Lithuanian language :oops: :lol:.

/Thomas


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