It is currently 2018 11 18, 21:15


All times are UTC + 2 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 6 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: Vowels for dummies, part 3: i, į and y
PostPosted: 2007 06 02, 10:43 

Joined: 2007 05 14, 18:19
Posts: 31
Location: Suomija
And welcome to the third chapter of the series. On the first hearing, this promises to be the easiest of the vowel series so far: all sound clearly 'i's to me, even if there are variations in sounds and length.

i, į and y
If I have understood correctly, 'į' and 'y' are longer sounds than 'i'. I can hear the longer length in some words, but not in all. Also now the stress appears to be the decisive factor.

Would it be any truth in assuming that if Lithuanian written language was composed and alphabetized now, the 'i's would be done differently? :P

_________________
GS


Top
Offline Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: 2007 06 02, 11:29 
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: 2006 07 06, 21:08
Posts: 696
Location: Kaunas
It's not exactly short (i) and long (y, į) vowels, but intensive (y, į) and unintensive (i). In fact, an i can be uttered longly, as if singing, however keeping its unintensiveness. Similarly, a y and į can be uttered so quickly that you would think it is 'short', however it's still intensive. The same applies to u, ū, ų.

Have in mind that the longness/intensiveness of the i/į/y doesn't change when they are stressed or not stressed. For example, you must learn to pronounce durys (doors) and ris (stab) in such a way that you could tell that the i is short or the y is long.

If Lithuanian written language was composed and alphabetized now, the 'i's would not be done differently :). Only in some dialects and slang, you can find that there's no difference between durys and ris regarding the i: both are pronounced [duris].


Top
Offline Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: 2007 06 04, 16:14 

Joined: 2007 05 14, 18:19
Posts: 31
Location: Suomija
Pigmalijonas wrote:
It's not exactly short (i) and long (y, į) vowels, but intensive (y, į) and unintensive (i). In fact, an i can be uttered longly, as if singing, however keeping its unintensiveness. Similarly, a y and į can be uttered so quickly that you would think it is 'short', however it's still intensive. The same applies to u, ū, ų.

Have in mind that the longness/intensiveness of the i/į/y doesn't change when they are stressed or not stressed. For example, you must learn to pronounce durys (doors) and ris (stab) in such a way that you could tell that the i is short or the y is long.

If Lithuanian written language was composed and alphabetized now, the 'i's would not be done differently :). Only in some dialects and slang, you can find that there's no difference between durys and ris regarding the i: both are pronounced [duris].


There seems to be quite a few delicate details in pronouncing Lithuanian vowels. :D Are there many possibilities of confusion if the vowels are pronounced a little sloppily? Could it change a compliment to an insult? :P

_________________
GS


Top
Offline Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: 2007 06 04, 16:45 
User avatar

Joined: 2006 09 08, 19:28
Posts: 952
Location: La Plata, Argentinos Respublika
It's funny you say i, į and y are easy vowels. I myself think these are the most difficult. Specially because of that intensivenes thing.
Quote:
There seems to be quite a few delicate details in pronouncing Lithuanian vowels.

Not only the vowels are difficult to pronounce. Consonant palatalization is another threat


Top
Offline Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: 2007 06 04, 17:16 

Joined: 2007 05 14, 18:19
Posts: 31
Location: Suomija
ascii wrote:
It's funny you say i, į and y are easy vowels. I myself think these are the most difficult. Specially because of that intensivenes thing.


I take my words back. The 'i's seem much trickier than I thought. :?

The Lithuanian kids must be very intelligent indeed to learn all the vowels and
finally the palatalization of consonants. :P

_________________
GS


Top
Offline Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: 2007 06 04, 20:33 
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: 2006 07 06, 21:08
Posts: 696
Location: Kaunas
gelezinkelio stotis wrote:
Are there many possibilities of confusion if the vowels are pronounced a little sloppily? Could it change a compliment to an insult? :P

Nah, they are not as crucial to meaning. As I said, some dialects and slang don't differ intensive and unintensive i's in non-stressed syllables.


Top
Offline Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 6 posts ]  Moderators: crankshaft, asCii

All times are UTC + 2 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group
Theme created StylerBB.net